domingo, 20 de março de 2016

The Veneer of Justice in a Kingdom of Crime

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Introduction 1:45
Part 1 - Background 7:59
Part 2 - The Untouchables 15:30
Part 3 - The Cover-Up 25:20
Part 4 - The Criminal King 34:43
Honor Roll 44:40


The criminal global banking cartel has effected a coup d’etat in the U.S. This is why the same criminal financial elite that saw 1000 of its members go to prison 20 years ago (after the S&L crisis) is now above the law.

To date, the question of why the U.S. Department of Justice has failed to prosecute even one too-big-to-fail bank for the pervasive criminal frauds that drove the multi-trillion-dollar economic meltdown of 2008 has been answered pretty much with shrugs.

By far the most insightful answer was provided by Martin Smith’s breathtaking Untouchables episode, which PBS Frontline aired in January 2013. See

But even Smith’s answer—that the DOJ never truly investigated Wall Street crime due largely to the so-called collateral consequences doctrine—really explains how rather than why prosecutions have been scuttled.

In an effort to pick up where the Untouchables left off in early 2013, BestEvidence presents “The Veneer of Justice in a Kingdom of Crime.” In addition to analyzing events that have occurred since the Untouchables aired (including events caused by the Untouchables), and in an attempt to answer some of the deeply troubling issues raised by Martin Smith, “Veneer" examines certain implications the DOJ's pronouncements, since late 2012, that the rule of law is effectively dead (having been supplanted by the management of oversized global banks).

What follows is a brief American legal history of the executive branch's overthrow by criminal global banks, which is divided into four roughly chronological segments.

I. Background (March 2010 to December 2012)

Goldman Sachs’ legal defenses to fraud—and the DOJ’s adoption of those defenses—are summarized and exposed as false. The DOJ soon admits it refrains from prosecutions not based on any law, but on unspecified collateral effects that prosecutions allegedly would have.

II. Lessons From the Untouchables (January 2013)

Since it won't prosecute Wall Street, the DOJ doesn't even bother conducting investigations. The overriding factor is collateral consequences. Two potential sources for collateral consequences opinions emerge: government regulators and the very financial institutions that have been accused of crimes.

III. The DOJ’s Endless Lies to Conceal Its Master (February 2013 - April 2014)

The DOJ’s claim that government regulators provided opinions on collateral consequences is exposed as a lie. There never were any such regulators. Instead, the DOJ’s sources of collateral consequences opinions are—as the DOJ itself once admitted, before falsely backtracking—the very banks accused of crimes. The collateral consequences doctrine itself is next exposed as a sham, used by global banks to declare immunity from their own crimes—the act of a king.

IV. Presenting the True Sovereign Power in the Executive Branch

The one bank that’s on record as having gained access to a DOJ conference room—where, as the DOJ previously admitted, global banks asserted immunity from their own crimes—is revealed. The true chain of command in the DOJ is presented.

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Pill Track


Dilate: Kung Fu Jonny OST

The New Industry

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